SCHOOL FOR SEAMAN
WEST COAST CENTER IS HELPING TRAIN 150,000 TO 200,000 MEN FOR DUTY WITH AMERICA'S WARTIME MERCHANT MARINE
The Seattle Sunday Times Rotogravure, February 22, 1942

In an effort to place between 150,000 and 200,000 experienced men in the 18,000,000 tons of new merchant ships, scheduled to be built in the next two years, the United States Maritime Service is operating five training stations and five ships to graduate able-bodied seamen.

The Maritime Service, administered for the United States Maritime Commission by the Coast Guard, offers men between 18 and 30 years old a seven-month course. Training normally includes three months at a station and three months at sea.

Enrollees become apprentice seamen and receive $21 a month until they are graduated. They must agree to serve at least a year at sea after finishing instruction. Then, as able-bodied seamen, they are paid a minimum of $72.50 monthly.

Two of the training stations and one ship are on the Pacific Coast. A school for inexperienced men and the training ship American Sailor are at Port Hueneme, Calif., where the accompanying pictures were made. Another station at Alameda, Calif., helps men with sea experience pass license examinations.

Other training stations and ships are at St. Petersburg, Fla., Hoffman Island, New York, and Gallups Island, Boston.

More than 150 Pacific Northwest residents have been sent to training stations since the war began. Enrollees must pass physical examinations required of Coast Guard recruits and must have proof of citizenship.

Prospective enrollees in the Pacific Northwest should apply in Room 31, Federal Office Building, Seattle; Room 306, Pioneer Postoffice Building, Portland: Room 246, Postoffice Building, Spokane, or inquire at any office of the United States Employment Service.

Tying up a ship to a dock Trainees at a Maritime Service Apparatus on the bridge
Tying up a ship to a dock is demonstrated for students by a Coast Guard instructor. After the first six weeks of training, the apprentices may take their choice of learning deck, engineering, or steward department duties. Trainees at a Maritime Service School in Port Hueneme, Calif., get lessons in splicing with the aid of a marlinspike from Jack Rhorabough of the United States Coast Guard. Apparatus on the bridge of the training ship American Sailor is explained to trainees by Chief Quartermaster Manuel F. Castro of the Coast Guard. The training vessel, a 10,000-ton converted merchant ship, provides practical and actual sea experience for students.


Press Release, U.S. Maritime Commission announcing opening of the USMS Training Station at Port Hueneme, California, on August 30, 1941

U. S. Maritime Service
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